Congratulations to this year’s winners!

1st Prize – Community Gardening for Social Ills (Montreal, Canada)

Produced Sven 7ven Creese, Mitchell McLarnon, and Lyne Dwyer

***

2nd Prize (tie) – Juala, Nairobi, Kenya

Produced by Ephantus Kariuki, William Kamau ‘Shikokoto’, Rosemary Nyambura Mwangi, Joab Mutisya, and Kelvin Irungu

***

2nd Prize (tie) – Indigenous Young Women’s Utopia, Saskatoon, Canada

Produced by the Treaty 6 Girls and their mentors Jennifer Altenberg, Sarah Flicker, Katie MacEntee and Kari Wuttunee

***

Honourable Mention – Isolated Network, Kamloops, Canada

Produced by Bobbie Vojtko, Hallan Mtatiro, Ben Laidlaw, and Liz Sax

Meet this year’s panelists!

Catherine Potvin is a professor in biology at McGill University who has been working since 1993 with Panama’s Indigenous groups including the Emberá, on cultural and environmental protection. Chair holder of the UNESCO/McGill Chair for Dialogues on Sustainability, and Trottier Professor in Sustainability and Science Outreach, and Miroslaw Romanowski Medal laureate (2012) from the Royal Society of Canada she is the co-founder of the  Festival Internacional de Cine Documental de Bayano in Panama that provides context for youth filmmaking training activities.

Ariella Orbach is a community development consultant who works with Indigenous communities in Canada and in Latin America to design, manage and facilitate projects that build capacity, engage youth, develop sustainable local economies and uncover innovative paths to community well-being. She has been collaborating closely with Mapuche communities in the Ayja Rewe Budi traditional territory (Wajmapu/Chile) since 2011.

Iphigénie Marcoux-Fortier has been concocting documentaries since the turn of the millennium. She has co-founded the production company Les glaneuses, through which she co-creates films anchored in the territory. These films raise questions of identity, highlight intercultural encounters, philosophies of life (or death) and, like a silent mantra, they listen to details. As a filmmaker-mentor, she has accompanied the creation of more than forty short films in an indigenous context. In light of this background, Iphigénie conceives documentary filmmaking as a political and poetic process, as a flagship tool, and as a tool for bridge building.

Thora Herrmann is Professor at the Université de Montréal, with expertise in action research-creation projects in polar regions on place-based Indigenous knowledge and identity using visual art-based methodologies, such as filmmaking and photovoice, and also interactive mapping. She works in First Nation, Inuit, Mapuche and Sámi contexts. She is co-editor (with Th. Martin) of the book “Indigenous Peoples Governance of Land and Protected Territories in the Arctic” (Springer, 2016), and co-editor (with S. Gergaud) of the forthcoming book “Indigenous Cinemas: representations in movement”(L’Harmattan).

6thcellphilm2

Save the date!

Join us on Monday, November 12th for the 6th International Cellphilm Festival.

This year, we are honoured to be joined by Dr. Thora Hermann, Ariella Orbach, and Iphigénie Marcoux-Fortier (Université de Montréal), who will lead a panel discussion entitled “The power of the lens: (re)building community on ancestral lands”. Their presentation will be accompanied by three short films directed by their project community’s researcher-filmmakers: Ince Ka Mogetun from the Mapuche Nation in Wallmapu (Chile), Nuestro Hogar from the Embera nation in Panama, and Hanna Boade Gaddaj from the Sami nation in Sapmi (Norway). All three films exemplify this year’s theme – Making Community.

cellphilm2018

Deadline Extended! (Oct. 29th)

How do you and your community (a small group of friends, members of a project or class, research colleagues, a global community, etc.) envision making community? You may choose to do this in view of a particular issue (climate change, violence, compassion) or, alternatively, to consider what ‘making community’ might mean in a context where people often struggle to find community.

Submissions should be no more than 90 seconds in length and should be uploaded to YouTube. Along with your YouTube link, we ask that you also submit a 200-300 word write-up that includes the following:

  • The title of your cellphilm and its country of origin
  • The names of all the cellphilm’s co-producers,
  • A short description of how your group went about creating the cellphilm and the film’s connection to this year’s theme.

All submissions should be sent to thecellphilmfestival@gmail.com by Monday, October 29, 2018.

Call for Cellphilms: 6th International Cellphilm Festival

 

Making Community_Sm

Making Community

Action, Activism, Advocacy, Art

How can mobile technology be part of social change? What can you do?  Make a cellphilm!

Grounded in participatory video and mobile media, cellphilm production allows groups to come together to highlight critical issues in their lives through the use of cellphones. This participatory, arts-based visual method is now recognized as an important contemporary tool for building and bridging communities.

The organizers of this year’s festival invite submissions that explore how you and your community (a small group of friends, members of a project or class, research colleagues, a global community, etc.) envision making community. You may choose to do this in view of a particular issue (climate change, violence, compassion) or, alternatively, to consider what ‘making community’ might mean in a context where people often struggle to find community.

Submissions should be no more than 90 seconds in length and should be uploaded to YouTube. Along with your YouTube link, we ask that you also submit a 200-300 word write-up that includes the following:

  • The title of your cellphilm and its country of origin
  • The names of all the cellphilm’s co-producers,
  • A short description of how your group went about creating the cellphilm and the film’s connection to this year’s theme.

All submissions should be sent to thecellphilmfestival@gmail.com by Monday, October 22, 2018.

Sponsored by the Participatory Cultures Lab and the McGill Art Hive Initiative under the umbrella of the Institute for Human Development and Well-Being